Book Reviews 2020

Here are all reviews from this year so far:

The Story of Civilization – Caesar and Christ by Will Durant
The Story of Civilization still excites me. This time we stop i Rome.
(sorry about misrepresentative picture.)
The Republic – Plato
It has been claimed that European philosophy “is only a series of retweets and replies to Plato.” and that’s one of the reasons I’m extremely happy to have read this one. It will be foundational as I continue my journey through the history of thought.
Lifespan – David A. Sinclair
The latest science and longevity research predicts that our lifespans will increase a lot the coming years. What does that mean for humanity?
Oversubscribed – Daniel Priestley
This is now my favorite marketing book and it will be my map and compass going forward in business.
When Breath Becomes Air – Paul Kalanithi
The one about the neuro-surgeon that gets cancer. A book that makes people cry.
Rejection Proof – Jia Jiang
The idea of rejection therapy is simple but powerful: get rid of fear of rejection by putting yourself in situations where you are very likely to be rejected.
Raising Lions – Joe Newman
The book that helped me get my 4 year old to behave properly.
Stillness is the Key – Ryan Holiday
Can you fix a body cramped up by office work and a anterior pelvic tilt by stretching consistently?
Discourses on the Origin of Inequality – Jean-Jacques Rousseau
The one about the noble savage.
The Social Contract – Jean-Jacques Rousseau
The Drunkard’s Walk – Leonard Mlodinow
The basic concepts of randomness is laid out in this books and how they are often overlooked. We are also served a great history of how the science of probability evolved.
Atomic Habits – James Clear
The one-stop-shop for habit building.
The Road to Wigan Pier – George Orwell
I found this book so powerful and humbling. A catalyst for personal reflection. A remarkably bold and honest book.
Never Split the Difference – Chris Voss
The definite book on negotiation by former FBI agent.
The Netocrats (Nätokraterna) – Alexander Bard / Söderqvist
A must-read and total mindf*ck. Being outdated is one of the strengths of this book. Because now, 20 years after the books release, we can see its predictions manifest in everyday life.
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